top of page

Acerca de

Safer options logo (002).png

Project summary: Safer Options (formerly the Safer Options from Aggression project) was a research project that aimed to strengthen the capacity of primary care providers in Western Australia (WA) to deliver accessible primary care services to LGBTIQA+ individuals experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). This research project was led by a research team in the Curtin School of Population Health and funding was provided by the WA Primary Health Alliance (WAPHA) awarded jointly to WAAC (formerly the WA AIDS Council) and Curtin University.

There were two key deliverables for the Safer Options project:

  1. The generation of recommendations concerning how recognition and responsiveness to IPV in the LGBTIQA+ community could be enhanced among primary care services and providers, and

  2. The co-design of hard-copy and online resources intended to improve recognition and responsiveness to IPV among primary care services, providers, and LGBTIQA+ individuals.

Project progress: There were two key deliverables for the Safer Options project:

  1. The generation of recommendations concerning how recognition and responsiveness to IPV in the LGBTIQA+ community could be enhanced among primary care services and providers, and

  2. The co-design of hard-copy and online resources intended to improve recognition and responsiveness to IPV among primary care services, providers, and LGBTIQA+ individuals.

Extensive consultation was undertaken with LGBTIQA+ individuals and WA metropolitan primary care providers. Methods used included an online survey, semi-structured interviews with LGBTIQA+ individuals and primary care providers, focus groups with LGBTIQA+ individuals, consumer navigator activities, and co-design workshops with LGBTIQA+ individuals and primary care providers.

 

Data revealed that IPV appears to be highly prevalent among LGBTIQA+ individuals in WA, with 1 in 2 LGBTIQA+ individuals in the research sample reporting ever having experienced one or more forms of abuse in their intimate relationships. LGBTIQA+ individuals who have experienced IPV reported difficulty accessing inclusive primary care services due to fear of judgement from providers. WA primary care providers revealed a lack of confidence to recognise IPV in LGBTIQA+ clients and have difficulty identifying and finding suitable primary care services to refer to.

Relevance for practice/policy: In response to the findings, we developed a website, two brochures, and a suite of posters to aid in the education and recognition of IPV among LGBTIQA+ individuals and primary care providers. These resources include information about IPV and how it may present in LGBTIQA+ relationships, tools to recognise unhealthy and healthy relationships, an LGBTIQA+ inclusive primary care service directory with emergency contacts, and information for how primary care providers can modify their service provision to be more inclusive of LGBTIQA+ individuals experiencing IPV.

Who is involved? Dr Roanna Lobo (Project Lead), Dr Jack Farrugia, Dr Bronwyn Milkins, Danny Della Vedova, Professor Sharyn Burns, Dr Jacqui Hendriks, & Dr Peta Dzidic.

Project website: www.saferoptions.org.au

website safer options.png
bottom of page